The Fourth Estate

The Fourth Estate

Book - 1996
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The world's most powerful newspaper barons - which of them will triumph? At first glance, Richard Armstrong and Keith Townsend seemed to have little in common. One was the son of an illiterate peasant, who emerged from the most backward corner of a Europe ravaged by a bitter war. The other was raised in a mansion on the far side of the world while the war was just another piece of news. One was a hustler, a thief, ready to change even his identity, if it would gain him a momentary advantage. The other was the scion of a well-known family, groomed for a public role, a rebel who didn't care if anyone approved of what he got up to. One craved wealth, recognition, status. The other quickly discovered that real power comes from anonymity. But they did have one thing in common. Both of them were gamblers. Both were prepared to risk everything in their battle to control the biggest newspaper empire in the world.From bestselling author Jeffrey Archer, The Fourth Estate is a tale of corruption, risk and two men who are willing to destroy each other to gain power.
Publisher: New York : HarperCollins, 1996.
ISBN: 9780330419086
9781250025364
Branch Call Number: ARC
Characteristics: 549 p.
Alternative Title: 4th estate

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c
cambridgedon
Oct 28, 2017

An excellent book by a master writer (though Rushdie would disagree) who knows the art of telling a story and keeping the reader engaged. Like Cain and Abel, this is one of Archer's best efforts with two well drawn out antagonists.

j
janwishart
Jun 11, 2015

Clearly a fictionalized version of Rubert Murdoch and Robert Maxwells rise to fame. Good saga.

path111 Jun 20, 2014

Gripping in the beginning chapters. A boy from a poor family is mentored by a merchant to draw out his native talent in business. He is savvy enough to see the threat to his family and life and endures suffering to flee the advancing Nazi army.

On the other side of the world, a privileged boy in an elite school develops his own brand of getting ahead at any cost. Both purchase newspapers and eventually face off in competition and destruction.

What starts strong bogs down in more and more of the same. Sometimes the self serving nature of the principal two characters reveals itself in surprising ways, but for hundreds of pages it seems more and more of the same. After really enjoying "Cain and Abel", this story began at a similar pace but soon lost steam.

c
cookiebear174
Mar 03, 2012

another fabulous book by Jeffrey Archer. this is about 2 guys who fight for the rights to be the guy who holds the biggest newspaper companies in the world.

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