Future Home of the Living God

Future Home of the Living God

A Novel

Large Print - 2017
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A tale set in a world of reversing evolution and a growing police state follows pregnant thirty-two-year-old Cedar Hawk Songmaker, who investigates her biological family while awaiting the birth of a child who may emerge as a member of a primitive human species.
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : HarperLuxe, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2017.
Edition: First HarperLuxe edition.
Copyright Date: ©2017
ISBN: 9780062695338
Branch Call Number: ERD
Characteristics: 418 pages (large print) ; 23 cm
large print

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WoodneathKristie
Mar 25, 2019

Future Home paints a gripping picture of a society ravaged by climatological and sociological crisis. Moving back and forth between the banality of upper-middle class suburban Minneapolis and the unique pacing of daily reservation life in remote northern Minnesota, the story uses contrast to underscore how people struggle to adapt when the extraordinary becomes the ordinary. Future home is less of a statement, and more of a question, and is best enjoyed if read in that light.

Banks_SusanC Oct 23, 2018

This novel has lots of compelling, appealing characters. The plot is a little out there, and the ending is not what we've come to expect from these types of stories. But, all-in-all, the book is thought-provoking and entertaining.

k
kazizumi
Sep 01, 2018

I love Erdrich's writing and was eager to read this after reading "Roundhouse" which I thought was a wonderful story. I could not immerse myself in the plot of this book.

n
NFN
Jun 02, 2018

This is a very disappointing book, with lots of underdeveloped themes, boring asides, and unconvincing characters. Better to stick with Atwood's original and far superior version of American dystopia.

j
joycerlove
May 28, 2018

I enjoyed this book until the ending, which left me feeling like I had just wasted 3-4 hours of my life.

k
ksellgren
May 10, 2018

This could easily serve as a prequel to Margaret Atwood’s “The Handmaid’s Tale”. It shows how our country could become Atwood’s terrifying dystopia.

d
durksenary
May 03, 2018

At some point Erdrich or her editor decided, several decades ago, that the manuscript wasn't ready for publication. They were right at the time and should have left it alone or made an effort to fix the problems. It's almost as if the author was tired of the story or simply didn't know where it was going. It doesn't have to be a tidy or happy ending, but the book should have had an ending that didn't seem as if the writer had simply given up.

Having said that, there were interesting parts, including the underlying idea that evolution was somehow turning on itself or reverse engineering a new form of human being. That would have been an interesting idea to pursue a bit more.

And, I much prefer Erdrich's dystopian vision to Atwood's, Erdrich's writing to Atwood's. This one didn't have the preachy tone of Alias Grace. So, there's that!

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BWilsoned
Apr 16, 2018

Wow! Erdrich knows how to write them, and this one is awesome. Cedar, part Ojibwe, adopted by crunchy hippies, finds her birth mother at a time when evolution, apparently, has stopped moving forward.
Pregnant women are imprisoned until they give birth so that healthy babies can be farmed out to other people. Of course, native women seem to be the ones able to produce healthy babies, so Cedar is on the run from the get-go.
Not a happy ending, so I was disappointed with that--I'm definitely a Pollyanna.

l
Lotushead
Apr 08, 2018

Louise paints a very frightening future.

ArapahoeAnnaL Apr 01, 2018

A lyrical celebration of and eulogy for maternal love and life as we know it. The book is told in the first person in the form of a letter 26 year old Cedar writes to her developing fetus. Not as well thought out as Erdrich's other books, but still a well written and thought provoking dystopian novel. A New York Times notable book of 2017.

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bluecocoa
Jul 28, 2018

bluecocoa thinks this title is suitable for 19 years and over

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anneholmquist
Dec 04, 2017

Postapocalyptic, women can't get pregnant or have enhanced (mutated) children,. Fertile women are held in prison until birth. Theocracy which keeps only "normal" children, which ar farmed out at birth. Indian woman with normal child in utero tells story to mbryo, then child is taken away.

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