A Splash of Red

A Splash of Red

The Life and Art of Horace Pippin

Book - 2013
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A Robert F. Sibert Honor Book

Winner of the Schneider Family Book Award

An ALA-ALSC Notable Children's Book

Winner of the NCTE Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children

As a child in the late 1800s, Horace Pippin loved to draw: He loved the feel of the charcoal as it slid across the floor. He loved looking at something in the room and making it come alive again in front of him. He drew pictures for his sisters, his classmates, his co-workers. Even during W.W.I, Horace filled his notebooks with drawings from the trenches . . . until he was shot. Upon his return home, Horace couldn't lift his right arm, and couldn't make any art. Slowly, with lots of practice, he regained use of his arm, until once again, he was able to paint--and paint, and paint! Soon, people--including the famous painter N. C. Wyeth--started noticing Horace's art, and before long, his paintings were displayed in galleries and museums across the country.

Jen Bryant and Melissa Sweet team up once again to share this inspiring story of a self-taught painter from humble beginnings who despite many obstacles, was ultimately able to do what he loved, and be recognized for who he was: an artist.
Publisher: New York : Alfred A. Knopf, [2013]
Edition: 1st ed.
ISBN: 9780375867125
Branch Call Number: 759.13 BRY
Characteristics: 1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Additional Contributors: Sweet, Melissa 1956-- Illustrator

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From the time Pippin could hold a piece of charcoal, he loved to draw, but when he returned home from World War I, he couldn’t even lift his right arm. How did he become an artist whose work is displayed in museums and galleries across the country? Full color illustrations.

From the time Pippin could hold a piece of charcoal, he loved to draw, but when he returned home from World War I, he couldn’t even lift his right arm. How did he become an artist whose work is displayed in museums and galleries across the country? Full color illustrations.

From the time Pippin could hold a piece of charcoal, he loved to draw, but when he returned home from World War I, he couldn’t even lift his right arm. How did he become an artist whose work is displayed in museums and galleries across the country? Full color illustrations.

BCD2013 Jun 12, 2014

NYPL Staff Pick
African-American artist Horace Pippin became a full-time painter after he was injured in World War I. A colorful account of Pippin's life and work.

BCD2013 Jun 12, 2014

NYPL Staff Pick
African-American artist Horace Pippin became a full-time painter after he was injured in World War I. A colorful account of Pippin's life and work.

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