Murder at Deviation Junction

Murder at Deviation Junction

Book - 2009
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From the author of The Necropolis Railway, The Blackpool Highflyer, and The Lost Luggage Porter comes another thrilling mystery featuring railway detective Jim Stringer. It is winter 1909, and Jim desperately needs his anticipated New Year's promotion in order to pay for a nurse for his ailing son.
Jumping at any opportunity to impress his supervisor, Jim agrees to investigate a standard assault in a nearby town. But when his train home hits a snowdrift and a body is discovered buried in the snow, Jim finds himself tracking another dangerous killer. Soon he is on a mad chase to find the suspect, trailing him to the furnaces of Ironopolis and across the country on a dangerous ride to the Highlands. As pursuer becomes pursued, Jim begins to doubt he will ever get his promotion-- or that he will survive this case at all.
Publisher: Orlando, Fla. : Harcourt, 2009.
Edition: 1st U.S. ed.
ISBN: 9780156034456
Branch Call Number: MAR
Characteristics: 249 p.

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j
jimg2000
Jul 31, 2014

Fast easy read, an old fashioned British detective story:

From Publishers Weekly
In Martins solid fourth Edwardian-era whodunit to feature railway detective Jim Stringer (after 2008s The Lost Luggage Porter), a blizzard forces the train on which Stringer, his wife and young son are riding home to York one cold December day to stop at a remote station. When workmen find the remains of photographer Paul Peters in a nearby storage building, a length of rope dangling from the roof beam above the body, Stringer discounts the obvious explanation that the man hanged himself. After Stringer realizes the exposures in Peterss camera are missing, he gets on the trail of a secretive upper-class society whose ranks had been dwindling until it went out of existence a year earlier. If he solves the murder, Stringer might just get promoted to sergeant. While the revelation of the crimes motive may disappoint some mystery fans, the period atmosphere and railroad lore provide ample compensation. (Jan.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

hgeng63 Jun 03, 2013

Very mild & unsuspenseful. The railway lore just flew over my head.

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j
jimg2000
Jul 31, 2014

Jim's wife: I saw a woman at some factory gates over opposite. She was all folded in on herself, quite motionless under accumulating snow. She looked like lot's wife, and I thought: this party is frozen solid, I must do something - but as I approached, she lifted up her head and smiled, as though it was quite a lark to be snow-coated

...

Jim on the case: Back in the high street, I saw that even the town hotel was called the White Swan, which seemed to be so in keeping with the whiteness of the place as to be ridiculous. I felt a powerful fancy for a pint of John Smith's, but I'd given my word to the wife, so I tramped on towards the station as afternoon changed to evening.

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